Media Mentions
Yearly since 2013, we are ranking the top fastest growing storage companies in sales, either start-ups, private or public firms, from 2015 to 2016 (calendar year or fiscal year), based on published figures only. This ranking will be updated when we will get more information from other companies. They are all privately held – but five – and about never reveal the exact figure of their sales. But a bunch of them have published press releases demonstrating their growth in percentage of sales, bookings or in number of customers or units shipped. We have classified below these firms depending on their published growth.
Date:
Software-Defined Storage (SDS) may hold a lot of promise. But implementation can be far from straightforward. Organizations may have hardware and software dating back several generations. So what is the best way to go about it? When thinking about implementing a first-generation, software-defined storage solution, make sure to include much more than just the hardware and software costs as you calculate your total cost of ownership (TCO). Add in the extra space, power and cooling costs for a lab to implement and test a solution before putting it into production, and put in headcount costs (and expertise) needed to implement a solution. “These are all important costs that must be factored in as a part of all new software-defined solutions,” said Steve Kenniston, vice president of product marketing, Infinidat.
Date:
Virtualisation, a mainstay in most IT environments today, has come to represent a panacea for the data centre, eradicating a tranche of issues associated with increasing workloads and organisational growth. But it doesn’t come without its problems. Through its inherent abstraction of physical hardware components, virtualisation maximises resources, increases data centre space and yields value from servers.Its benefits are many, including saving capex costs on physical hardware, achieving better utilisation of existing resources and better balance of performance and management.In addition, the costs for infrastructure administration and management remain within IT operations and the maximum return on the hardware investment can be achieved.
Date:
How can Infinidat promise storage that’s both highly available and low cost? Its CEO explains. Moshe Yanai has an impressive track record in the storage industry. Some 20 years ago while working at EMC, he developed the Symmetrix storage array and from there he moved on to start up the storage array company XIV, which was sold to IBM. He’s now come out of retirement to work on another new project, a storage company called Infinidat. The hottest innovation in storage currently is flash memory. It seems that everybody in the IT storage world is talking about flash, a technology that offers fast storage at a high cost when compared to conventional storage.
Date:
INFINIDAT is tweaking its Infinibox array design to increase its capacity. The present 3U drive trays and 2U controller enclosures will each become 1U trays, enabling an increase from 480 drives to 720 in a rack – a 67 per cent increase. These drive trays hold 60 vertically mounted disk drives. At INFINIDAT’s Herzliya office, press visitors saw an Infinibox array in the data centre with three 1U server enclosures, releasing 3U from the current 3 x 3U controller (Dell 370 server) enclosures. Below this were 1U drive trays holding rows of flat-mounted Seagate 3.5in Constellation ES drives. We calculated there were 20 drives per tray and space for 36 trays in the rack, making up the 720-drive total we were quoted.
Date:
Moshe Yanai was once a key figure in the growth of EMC, the Hopkinson-based data storage giant that helped put a spotlight on Massachusetts’ technological prowess before attention shifted from the Route 128 tech corridor to Cambridge and Boston. Years later, Yanai is looking to bring attention back to Route 128 — where many tech companies are still located — with INFINIDAT, his enterprise data storage startup that reached a $1.2 billion valuation last year and had a grand opening for its new, 23,000-square-foot U.S. headquarters in Waltham on Tuesday. With a large, emerald-tinged logo seen from outside INFINIDAT’s Totten Pond Road building, the startup is looking to give a big first impression to Fortune 1000 customers who visit its new headquarters to see its InfiniBox storage system, which the company says has a larger storage capacity than competitors like EMC and IBM, as well as a lower price per gigabyte.
Date:
One of Massachusetts’ billion-dollar startups, INFINIDAT, celebrated on Tuesday the move from Needham to a 23,000-square-foot office in Waltham, which CEO Moshe Yanai hopes will be the launching pad for a new era of enterprise data storage. INFINIDAT’s Massachusetts headcount has grown from 35 employees in March to 60 today. The company expects that number to at least double by the end of 2017. INFINIDAT has about 400 employees worldwide and its corporate headquarters are in Israel, but the Waltham office will be a focus of growth because about 70 percent of revenue comes from the U.S. market, said Gareth Taube, the firm’s vice president of marketing.
Date:
Big iron array vendor INFINIDAT has made its third major software release, adding compression, baked-in iSCSI support and enhanced array analytics. The company’s architecture has 3 controller nodes, which each can see all the drives, and eschews an all-flash design, relying instead on up 1.2TB – 3.2TB of DRAM caching, 24TB to 210TB of NAND cache, and up to 480 x 7,200rpm disk drives. The system offers seven “nines” of uptime year – 99.99999 per cent availability. There are now four Infinibox arrays in the range: F1000 with up to 115TB of usable capacity, 3GB/sec bandwidth and 300,000 IOPS F2000 with 248TB – 499TB of usable capacity, 7GB/sec bandwidth and 500,000 IOPS F4000 with 682TB – 1,024TB of usable capacity, 10GB/sec bandwidth and 750,000 IOPS F6000 with 1,035TB – 2,765TB of usable capacity,12.5GB/sec bandwidth and 1,000,000 IOPS The entry-level F1000 arrived in August this year.
Date:
INFINIDAT, one of the few storage vendors still singing the praises of hard disk drives, is adding compression, native iSCSI and performance analytics to its high-end enterprise array platform. The company came out of stealth in 2015 selling INFINIDAT InfiniBox petabyte-scale storage systems. Its original target was the enterprise market that its founder Moshe Yanai helped EMC gain a foothold in nearly 30 years ago. Now it is trying to appeal to service providers with new features in its software version 3.0. Although flash makes up a mere three percent of InfiniBox’s total capacity, INFINIDAT claims its systems are faster than all-flash arrays. INFINIDAT InfiniBox uses flash for cache but stores all data on hard disk drives (HDDs).
Date: